Archive for the ‘India’ Category


It’s a murky and gloomy morning. You wake up and switch on your computer and login to the virtual world. You are eager to see if anyone has purchased your new creation in the virtual world – The new outdoor lounger.

 

As your computer starts up you think about the advertisement you had set up to sell your creation.

The new outdoor lounger – set comes complete with table & umbrella as well as 2 loungers. Great for any pool area or deck. Modifiable so you can color anyway you like.

Was it good enough to make a sell, you wonder!

 

Finally you login to you Second Life and are really elated to see that someone has purchased your Outdoor Lounger. You have made L$300. That’s now enough Linden Dollars to buy that virtual private island you were eying since quite some time now. You make final checks on the virtual property and virtually interact with the property holder and crack a deal. The Linden Dollars exchange hands and now you are the proud owner of the private island on the web.

 

Seems like fiction? Well, this is the modern World Wide Web (www) for you. This is actual reality and it is happening and working as you read this. There are millions of registered residents on Second Life and presently many of them are creating new gizmos to sell in the virtual world, many are interacting with exciting people, making friends, some are attending Harvard Law classes, some are virtually experiencing the new car on the block, the list is endless.

 

On the market, Linden Dollar vs US Dollar stands at 271.3 L$/USD as of 26th June, 2007 9:16pm PDT. US Dollars spent in Second Life over last 24 hours $1,680,771 as of 26th June, 2007 7:29pm PDT.

 

Hard to digest?
Well then digest these:

 

  • Toyota is the first carmaker to enter Second Life. It has been giving away free virtual vehicles of its Scion brand. Read more>>>
  • Microsoft Uses Second Life to Promote Visual Studio. Read more>>>

 

When you hear names like Toyota and Microsoft, you know it all ought to be serious.

 

All this time, I have been talking about Second Life, an Internet-based virtual world. A creation of Linden Research, Inc. Follow this link get a second life>>> 🙂

 

There is a changing trend in the world we live in and we are unknowingly getting used to this change. More and more of our activities are shifting towards the internet. Nowadays the powerful desktops or laptops we were using to crunch our complex tasks has now virtually become a medium to plug into the Internet and all our work is being done with online applications.

 

Be it the latest MashUp site, your web desktop, your online spreadsheets, your blog; be it anything on Web 2.0, it has all become a part of our daily life now. Now, unknowingly we are getting used to the new trend on the raise – The Web 3.0.

 

Artificial intelligence, Distributed computing, Semantic Web, Scalable vector graphics, Second Life are all part of Web 3.0. More and more stress has been put on transforming the web into a 3D space. As we brace ourselves for the new 3D experience of the Internet, I often wonder – Are we ready for it? Is India ready for this change? Is India up to pace with the technology?

 

Web 1.0 was dial-up, 50K average bandwidth, Web 2.0 is an average 1 megabit of bandwidth and Web 3.0 will be 10 megabits of bandwidth all the time

Reed Hastings, founder and CEO of Netflix, at the Technet Summit, Nov 2006.

 

If you are a techy guy, you would have understood by now that the most basic infrastructure required for accessing something this heavy is your Internet Bandwidth. I was reading an article recently in the Times of India which had reported a study on how India fares when it comes to Broadband penetration. According to the report, at present the broadband penetration is at an alarmingly low level, at around 4%. This speaks a lot about the hardware infrastructure presently available in the country.

 

Every common man who wants to get a Broadband connection now in India now knows how hard a task it is. I wanted a broadband connection to my house and had to scout around and went to various providers available. All had the same response. There were not enough ports available and there was already a big queue in place. I finally decided to go with BSNL and applied for it. After a 6 month long wait, I finally got the broadband connection I was looking out for.

 

So this makes me wonder. Are we sitting on a good enough hardware infrastructure to experience the full power of what the modern day web has to offer? I wonder if there is anything being done to improve it. Are providers in India already thinking about the potential of the broadband market? Is there enough help from the government on this front?

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PRATIBHA WHO?

Posted: June 19, 2007 in India, Politics, Thoughts

As the presidential election drama unfolds, here is a very good article which makes you think about the ground realities behind all this.

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PRATIBHA WHO?

– The criterion for president is not just loyalty, but future loyalty

Writing On The Wall – Ashok. V. Desai

I did not read the headlines carefully enough. What registered in my mind was that some Patil was chosen as presidential candidate by the Congress and supported by the Bahujan Samaj Party, and that their combined numbers would ensure her election. I could not place the name immediately. Then I remembered that Parvati Patil was a fellow student of Harry Potter. That made her famous enough; and now she must be close to adulthood, so it should be all right. But she had a sister, Padma, who would be equally eligible; which of the two had the Congress chosen?

I looked again, and found it was Pratibha Patil. Good, I thought. We Indians boast of being a democracy. We tell everyone that even a tiffin carrier could become president of India; it is great if we have chosen a really unknown Indian.

But why this preference for obscurity, when we have so many illustrious Indians? There is Amitabh Bachchan, the consummate actor who has the right word for every occasion. There is his daughter-in-law, Aishwarya Rai — sorry, Bachchan — whose eyes would bewitch the whole world. If you are on the other side, there is Shah Rukh Khan, who would display to the nation his patented technology of breaking hearts. And if you want a more international figure, there is Shilpa Shetty, whom the British think of as delectable Miss India.

There is Amartya Sen, the Nobel laureate who can write three speeches in one flight and make each sound different. There is Ram Guha, who can make history as interesting as fiction; his president’s XI that would beat all the world’s cricket teams. If you are on the other side, there is Arundhati Roy, the bad-tempered beauty who has put her literary talent at the service of the goddess of environment. And if you prefer an achiever to a wordsmith, there is Ela Bhatt, who brought a livelihood to poor housebound women.

There is Ratan Tata, the industrialist that the largest number of Indians admire. If you admire size, you can choose Lakshmi Mittal, who controls the world’s largest steel production capacity. Then there is Azim Premji, who turned a vegetable oil factory into India’s biggest software factory. Or there is Sunil Mittal, who defeated every obstructive or greedy telecommunications minister and created a business in ten years as big as what took the Ambanis forty years to develop. And if you like showmanship, none could be better than Vijay Mallya. President’s parties would be adorned by fountains of Scotch; and Abdul Kalam’s herb garden would be replaced by a race course.

There is Vishwanathan Anand, who two months ago became the world’s champion chess player. He would probably not accept presidency while he is at the peak of his career; nor Sania, who is still going up the ladder. Sachin Tendulkar just might, if he accepts the emerging opinion that he is past his peak. I would prefer Mahendra Singh Dhoni, provided he grows his hair long again. But both may decline, since there is more glory in playing cricket before 30 million viewers than in giving the Independence Day speech to 300 schoolchildren and 500 policemen. So maybe we should go down to Kapil Dev, the best living Indian cricketer. Then there are artists: Husain the grand painter, Susmit Sen, leader of Indian Ocean band, and Salman Rushdie, the writer with the beautiful wife.

If the president were elected by direct vote of the Indian people, I bet that any of the 21 people I have named would get more votes than Pratibha Patil. How did the Congress decision-makers reject all of them and settle on her?

The answer could be that much as the prime minister keeps exhorting Indians to achieve excellence, excellence was the last thing they were looking for. Let alone excellence, they did not even want outstanding achievement. Politicians do everything to defeat merit; reservations are standing testimony to their distaste for it.

But more likely, it is a matter of caste. The candidate had to be a politician. It was reported last year, when Sourav Ganguly was ejected from the cricket team, that Buddhadeb Bhattacharjee had offered him a seat in the upper house of parliament. But that was to be a reward, not for being a good cricketer, but for being a victimized Bengali. And it was intended to make a politician out of Sourav. But even in the depths of his misfortune, he refused to convert to politics. In any case, the Communist Party of India (Marxist) would never put up Sourav for presidency; he has achieved too much to qualify.

But lack of achievement cannot be a qualification. Almost every politician would qualify if it were, and it would be impossible to choose a candidate. Even the Congress insists on some qualifications in presidential candidates. The foremost qualification is loyalty. So many people have left the Congress over the years; the Bharatiya Janata Party would be a shadow of itself if all ex-Congressmen left it. And if you are a Congressman, you do not have to leave the party to be disloyal. Since the present Congress is Congress (Indira), any flirtation with Congress (Organization) forty years ago would have disqualified Pratibha Patil. Congress (O) was at least a separate party; even if she had flirted with Narasimha Rao her future would have been blighted. The loyalty required is not loyalty to the party, but to the dynasty of the party.

But even the number of dynasty loyalists is too large; a further criterion of choice was needed. It goes beyond past loyalty; it amounts to future loyalty. After he is made president, the candidate must not develop a conscience and disobey the party’s orders. This is difficult to ensure, for the president can no longer be disciplined for disloyalty to the party. He could be impeached. But disloyalty would not be sufficient grounds for that; something more serious like moral turpitude would be necessary. How can one guarantee that a president would do one’s bidding?

The Congress does so by choosing a candidate who has never taken a decision on his own, even when given a chance to do so. Pratibha Patil was not just a Congress loyalist; she was a Chavan loyalist. That meant that as long as he was alive, she took his advice and did his bidding, even when she was a minister. And when he died, she transferred her obedience to the next dynasty loyalist in Maharashtra. Unshakeable resolution never to act independently was the final qualification that made her the chosen candidate.

So I am afraid Pratibha Patil will be a rather colourless president; forty years’ habit is difficult to break. This is no cause for disappointment, for most previous presidents were no different. Varahagiri Venkata Giri, Fakhruddin Ali Ahmed, Neelam Sanjeeva Reddy, Giani Zail Singh and Shankar Dayal Sharma had the same qualifications as Pratibha Patil. Their tenures were so forgettable that Pratibha Patil cannot do worse. She has a wonderful job; expectations are so low that she can only surprise us. She may have been waiting patiently for forty years to get this chance of surprising the whole nation. Let us wait for the surprise, but do not hold your breath.

As written by Ashok. V. Desai (The Telegraph article)

India becomes a better sport

Posted: October 5, 2006 in India, Sports

Cricket frenzy India has been evolving in terms of sports following in recent times. People are now looking into other sports as well. This has been a radical but a pleasant change for Indian Sports.

There were times in the past were Cricket was the only sport played and followed in India. It was followed almost like another religion. It was really hard to find an Indian who did not like / know about Cricket (May be it stays that way even now!). Cricket has been a common mans game which has been played on every gully or streets of India. It was quite common to see people of all ages come together to be a part of a Cricket match. India used to always get united when there was a Cricket match around.

To add to this entire following, media went ho-hum if it got to hear anything to do with Cricket. Cricket news used to make big-time headlines and if India was doing well, we could find news about this all over the daily newspapers. If it was an Indo-Pak match the stakes used to catapult many times over. And if India did win their matches against Pakistan, media used to cover it as though they dint have any other news to write / talk about. Almost every page in the newspapers used to have something to with the game. Player stats, match stats, upcoming events, fantasy games to name a few. Every person used to have an opinion about their stars – how they fared, what they could have done better, does he have a future, etc.

All this was good in a way. But the negative side to this was that other sport in India used to take a backseat. There was a broad array of talent in all other sport in India which never used to get a platform to kick off. It was never easy for a sports person to get a simple sponsorship support them to keep their talents alive – all because they were not into Cricket.

There had been tremendous achievements in other sport as well. But it used to always go unnoticed. Karnam Malleswari won the Weight Lifting Bronze Medal in Olympics; Pullela Gopichand won the All England open in 2001. I am sure more than half the population of India never got to know about this when it happened. I am sure it is not hard to find people who still don’t know these names. On the other hand if India had won against even a weak team like Bangladesh it would have got unprecedented media coverage.
All this is changing for good now. In recent times sport viewers are considering about following other sport as well. Now it is really nice to find people ready to sponsor talents like Narain Karthikeyan, Sania Mirza, Rathore, etc. Slowly we can see sports like football, tennis, badminton replacing cricket in every gully or street. All this may have been helped by:

  • India not doing that well in Cricket in recent past
  • Talents like Narain Karthikeyan, Sania Mirza doing well on international circuits
  • Big events like FIFA 2006, F1, ATP tours getting lot better media coverage

Nowadays I find:

  • Pubs going absolutely full when there is a F1 race going on
  • Children who used to take to the streets playing cricket now find it interesting to play Football (Next time you find a group of children playing football near your street, make it a point to observe them. I am sure you will be amazed at all the talent there.)
  • More people wearing football jerseys rather than the common Indian Cricketing Blue
  • People making it a point to watch important ATP tour matches
  • Many fantasy game online for other sport as well

Hope this change in trend continues and we get to see lot more deserving talents come into limelight.

India Then…

Posted: February 24, 2006 in India

Try this Link… India Then
Very intresting set of pictures of India in the past. Great collection.